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FAQ General

What do you consider original and collectible movie memorabilia?

Do you buy or trade movie & TV memorabilia?

How do you know for sure that all your products are the real deal?

How do you establish the prices of your items?

How do you remove a movie poster from a tube safely?

How do you flatten a tightly rolled poster damage-free?

What is a vinyl movie banner?

What are Standees aka Cut Outs aka Standups?

What are promo or promotional items?

What are press kits?

What are press photos?

What are (S)Exploitation movies?

What are Blaxploitation movies?

What do you consider original and collectible movie memorabilia?

Original and collectible movie memorabilia is:

1 - PRODUCED BY OR FOR A MOVIE STUDIO AND DISTRIBUTED TO THEATRES (AND (VIDEO)STORES) AS ADVERTISING MATERIAL.

2 - NOT MEANT TO BE DISTRIBUTED AND/OR SOLD TO THE PUBLIC.

We consider ALL material that is produced and distributed as advertising material, but not meant to be distributed and/or sold to public, original and collectible. This includes: video posters, promotional posters/items and press material.

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Do you buy or trade movie & TV memorabilia?
We constantly buy and trade old and new movie posters, lobby cards, stills etc. if the price is right. Please mail us your items including condition, description and price.

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How do you know for sure that all your products are the real deal?
MotionPictureArt.com works with certified experts in order to make sure that every piece we sell is authentic. Through our years in the industry, we know who the experts are, and they are used to dealing with us.
We do not take any risks with the products that we sell. If any part of the equation does not add up, we simply do not sell that item.
95% of all our items are bought from movie distributors and movie theatres. Some items also have stamps and/or other markings from The Dutch Movie Board or the distributor. We also check the sizes and other known info of the posters and other products to confirm that they are genuine.
If you have any questions regarding our products, please contact us.

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How do you establish the prices of your items?
Prices are established according to:

  • age,
  • significance of the movie, the director, the actors, etc.,
  • artwork,
  • artist reputation,
  • market references,
  • current popularity,
  • condition,
  • and availability.

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How do you remove a movie poster from a tube safely?
If unable to remove a poster from a tube, lightly moisten index finger and place it on the folded edge of the poster inside the tube and rotate the rolled poster either clockwise or anti-clockwise with finger to reduce the diameter of the rolled poster before you attempt to pull it out of the tube.
By reducing the diameter of the rolled poster it should now be a matter of sliding the poster out of the tube with the same finger used to decrease the diameter.
In short, you insert a slightly moistened index finger so that it adheres to the poster while you rotate it to reduce the rolled diameter of the poster. Once the diameter is reduced below the diameter of tube in which the poster was shipped, with that same finger you inserted onto the edge of the rolled poster inside the tube, you gradually and carefully withdraw (pull) the rolled poster from the tube using a slight rotating action and if no resistance is evident you simply carefully pull the poster out of the tube!

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How do you flatten a tightly rolled poster damage-free?
A Rolled Poster Can Be Easily Damaged If Not Un-rolled Properly Resulting in Wrinkles, Creases, Marks, Lines or even Tears in the poster! Here is a damage-free technique for flattening a tightly rolled poster:

  • Step 1 Remove poster from the shipping tube (see above).
  • Step 2 Use an object with a smooth exterior surface similar to the poster tube the poster arrived in. Use the poster tube if it is evidently clean and free of sticky tape and like material on the exterior surface. The object used must be slightly longer than the width of the poster being flattened.
  • Step 3 Starting with the edge of the folded poster, reverse roll the poster around your chosen object.
  • Step 4 With the poster rolled over the chosen object, place an elastic band at each end of the reversed-rolled poster and a third in the middle to hold the poster in place. Ensure that poster is firmly rolled around the tube before applying the elastic bands to ensure evenness.
  • Step 5 With the elastic bands holding the reversed-rolled poster in place, let the reversed-rolled poster seat for approximately 8 to 10 hours on a clean surface.
  • Step 6 To unfold and flatten the reversed-rolled poster, first remove the elastic bands, unroll the poster, then place it flat on a clean surface.
  • Step 7 Add some weight over the four corner edges and in the middle of the unfolded poster using books or similar flat-surafaced objects to keep poster flat. With weight on, let poster seat for approximately 2 to 4 hours. Heavy stock and ultra shinny posters tend to resist reverse rolling and may need the weights on a little longer. Tip! If you remove the weights and the poster quickly reverts back to its original folded state, it's an indication that the weights should be replaced and kept on longer!
  • Step 8 Remove all the weights applied and your poster should be flat without wrinkles or other damages!

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What is a vinyl movie banner?
All banners in this category are original movie (or video) banners as used in cinemas/theatres and stores to promote/advertise the movie. Available through theatres or theatre owners only.
These oversized film collectibles have a better print quality on higher quality paper or other material than the commercial prints that are for sale in stores, they are very collectable and gain in value every year.
While many of these oversized vinyl banners for current release films are printed massively in the USA, many foreign countries still make their own for American films, with sometimes very different often even superior art, and printed in smaller numbers.
For the classics the price of a foreign release banner will often (but not always) be higher than or equal to that of the American originals. In the case of newer titles the harder to find foreign items are more valuable.
We (almost) only have foreign products with images that are better or at least as good as the American banner for the same movie. A lot of international banners provide art variety with often the text (credits, cast, title etc.) in the English language, thus more exciting to the US collector!
Movie Banners:
Film Banners became very popular in the mid-1930’s. They were primarily offered for big budget films and were extremely popular with movie exhibitors because of their versatility.
Film Banners come in a variety of sizes, but most often measure about three to four feet in width to eight to twelve feet in length, either horizontal which is landscape style or vertical which is portrait style. They are usually printed on vinyl or canvas and can be used indoors or outdoors due to their weather resistant nature. Some banners come with reinforced holes, a hanging bar, velcro and/or other glue adhesives. Banners can be released as teasers, advances or regulars. Their artwork can vary from simplistic to extremely detailed.
Although banners occupy a large amount of storage and display space, they still are considered very collectible to movie art collectors. Banners are printed in limited numbers which makes them harder to obtain than other more common sizes and forms of artwork.
Original posters and banners from the original country of release of the film are the most valuable and collectible!
The field of foreign collectibles is still a subject of debate, but their investment value has been proven in many cases.

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What are Standees aka Cut Outs aka Standups?
All standees in this category are original movie (or video) standups and standees as used in cinemas/theatres and stores to promote/advertise the movie. Available through theatres or theatre and store owners only.
These oversized film collectibles are not for sale in stores, are very collectable and gain in value every year.
While many of these oversized standees for current release films are produced in the USA, many foreign countries still make their own for American films, with sometimes very different often even superior art, and printed in smaller numbers.
For the classics the price of a foreign release standee will often (but not always) be higher than or equal to that of the American originals. In the case of newer titles the harder to find foreign items are more valuable.
We (almost) only have foreign products with artwork that is better or at least as good as the American standee or standup for the same movie. A lot of international standees provide art variety with often the text (credits, cast, title etc.) in the English language, thus more exciting to the US collector!
Standees aka Standups:
A standee is any type of display that basically stands on its own or is able to be displayed with little or no outside support. A standee can range from a small counter top display to a larger than life lobby size display, and anything in between. Most standees are constructed of heavy duty cardboard. Standees in all forms are extensively used in today's film theatres. Some of the displays are extremely large, incorporating motors, holograms, sound effects, motion activation, mobiles, window stickers and other types of advertising materials to complete an elaborate lobby display.
Since the term "standee" can mean any type of cardboard display, it is difficult to establish when the first such display was used. It is known that some of the earliest theatres constructed their own displays, these could be considered the first standees.
Because many of the standups are put together from a number of pieces to stand, they are sometimes difficult to take apart without any damage. This makes an undamaged used standup hard to find. As with all other forms of movie advertising, there are certain collectors who collect standups.
Original standees from the original country of release of the film are the most valuable and collectible!
The field of foreign collectibles is still a subject of debate, but their investment value has been proven in many cases.
Generally we tend to underrate the conditions of our products.
We realize that everybody has his or her own standards of grading and therefore advise that, if you have any question as to what something looks like, to please mail us and we'll try to give a more detailed description.

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What are promo or promotional items?
All film promo items in this category are original movie (or video) products to help promote/advertise the movie.
Promotional film items are printed or produced to be given away or to be won in contests. They are usually given away at movie theatres and stores or handed out to the press and other media.
These items can either be printed or produced in very large or limited numbers, sometimes bearing diffrent art than the original theatre posters or other pieces of artwork.
Examples of promo items are: flyers, posters, keychains, stickers, t-shirts, cards, caps, leaflets, candy, toys, pins, buttons, cds and lots of other products in all kinds of shapes and sizes made of various materials. Promotional products can also be replicas of props and items as seen or used in the film. Good examples of this are the replica bars of soap from the movie Fight Club, directed by David Fincher and starring Brad Pitt, or the "Pussy Wagon" keychain from Kill Bill, directed by Quentin Tarantino and starring Uma Thurman.

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What are press kits?
Promotional film press kits, aka presskits, are produced to be handed out to the press and other media. As far as its contents, no two press kits are alike. They are often issued as color folders, containing movie information, cd-roms, slides, pictures/stills and other items, that critics receive from the studios to liven up their reviews. Film press kits usually measure around 8/9x11/12 inch (23x31 cm) in size, are printed in color and designed to communicate to reporters and media directors. They are used to help the media gain an understanding of the movies so they will write about them and use the photos as illustrations. These kits are also distributed to movie theatres or film exchanges to help give them ideas on how to create a successful film campaign to get movie-goers into their theatres.
Press kits, aka presskits, are distributed by movie studios as early as the 1910’s, but were then usually referred to as campaign kits. These campaign kits were more comprehensive than those kits known today. The form that the press kit takes and the items that are part of it vary from film to film and studio to studio. Press kits come in all shapes and sizes. The movie studios outline a promotional campaign based on the potential success of the film and design their advertising materials accordingly. Since the 1980's, many of the film studios have standardized their press kits to some extent, but to this day, no two press kits are alike.
Since the 1980's, most major studios put their press materials in a folder. If the film is expected to be a hit, the press kit cover will normally contain the name and/or logo of the film or even beautiful full color artwork. Some studios have a standard cover with the studio's name only that they use for all of their minor releases. Some studios also issue kits for a series of movies, like a studio's planned summer or winter releases. Press kits from smaller studios may not come in a cover, but are simply placed in an envelope and mailed to the press or the film distributors. Because a film's success depends heavily on its advertising campaign, press kits are as important today as they were in the beginning of the film industry. There are very few films distributed that are not accompanied by some type of press kit.
Today's press kits are also issued as digital press kits or interactive digital press kits which contain basically the same materials, the only difference is that they are on a cd or DVD instead of paper. Digital press kits lets the theatre manager or the press have the standard digital material but also links to specially prepared websites. This gives the studios the freedom to continually update and add to the presentation.
What is inside a press kit?
Ad Slicks, advertising blocks in differing sizes that are ready for printing in a newspaper or magazine. A listing of advertising materials and merchandising tie-in products. Black and white or color photos aka stills. These pictures of the stars in certain scenes often have full credit information on the bottom, sometimes these photos are also provided on a cd-rom. A book or booklet that gives information of the movie's production, its stars, plot, crew and other interesting information.
Sometimes press kits may also contain buttons, premiums (t-shirts, stickers, cards, etc.) screening tickets and color slides.
Many foreign countries made and still make their own movie and video press kits, with sometimes very different often even superior art or design, and in smaller numbers.
Press kits are very popular collectibles because they give so much information about the movie, its cast and the history of a film. In addition, they sometimes contain stills, slides or other promo items that are not for sale to the public. Press kits are affordable and easier to obtain.

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What are press photos?
Promotional film press photos, also called stills or pictures, are printed to be handed out to the press and other media. These glossy photos of the stars in certain scenes often have full credit or descriptive information on the bottom, nowadays these photos are also provided on a cd-rom or through a special website. They are usually issued in sets and often shipped together with other items in film press kits that critics receive from the studios to liven up their reviews. Their soul purpose is to promote the movie title. Film press photos are usually 8x10 inch in size, printed in black and white, but also color and designed to communicate to reporters and media directors. They are used to help the media gain an understanding of the movies so they will write about them and use the photos as illustrations. These stills are also distributed to movie theatres or film exchanges to help give them materials and ideas on how to create a successful film campaign to get movie-goers into their theatres.
These pictures which grace the articles are usually the first thing that grabs our attention, and sometimes it's the only thing that we look at. Often, many unseen pictures are distributed for each movie.
Many foreign countries made and still make their own movie and video press photos, with sometimes very different often even superior art or design, and in smaller numbers.

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What are (S)Exploitation movies?
(S)Exploitation movies are usually BANNED and CONTROVERSIAL Cult/B-Movies that are very hard to find! Often X-Rated and with loads of gruesome spectacles and nudity. These movies are banned in most countries or heavily cut & censored. That's why it's pretty hard to find original movie theatre material of these movies. If you do find promotional items of these titles, than they are probably from Europe.

Some of the sub-genres are:

  • Women-In-Prison & Slave Camps
  • Cannibals & Zombies
  • Nazi & SS
  • Nuns & Religion

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What are Blaxploitation movies?
A Blaxploitation movie is an exploitation movie with an (almost) all-black cast.
Recommended Titles: Shaft, Foxy Brown, Coffy & Dolemite!

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